Amazing Ted Med

Amazing Ted Med

Physician David Casarett was tired of hearing hype and half-truths around medical marijuana, so he put on his skeptic's hat and investigated on his own. He comes back with a fascinating report on what we know and what we don't -- and what mainstream medicine could learn from the modern medical marijuana dispensary.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED's editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

The Fight for Safe Medical Marijuana Access Continues

Isn't it amazing that after more than a decade we still have to defend our right to safe access to medicine! When will the lobbyists against cannabis realize that this industry is NEVER going away?! 

Click on the photo below to read this full article from Buzz Feed.


 Medicinal Cannabis Activists Are Furious And Think Politics Is Getting In The Way Of Progress  After the Senate voted down a motion last week that would have allowed fast-tracked access to medicinal cannabis for the terminally ill, activists all over the country moved to condemn the government.

Medicinal Cannabis Activists Are Furious And Think Politics Is Getting In The Way Of Progress

After the Senate voted down a motion last week that would have allowed fast-tracked access to medicinal cannabis for the terminally ill, activists all over the country moved to condemn the government.

Click here to read full article!

Friday Flavors

Hey everyone -

We've got new flavors of flower and vapes fresh on the shelf. Take your pick or try them all and let us know which ones you like best!

Have a great weekend!

 New strains in order from left to right:  Do-si-dos, Plush Berry, OG Kush, So Mango, Sour Diesel, Banana Split

New strains in order from left to right:

Do-si-dos, Plush Berry, OG Kush, So Mango, Sour Diesel, Banana Split

Grizzly Pine Strains Back

Science Seeks to Unlock Marijuana Secrets

 As the once-vilified drug becomes more accepted, researchers around the world are trying to understand how it works and how it might fight disease.   Read full article...

As the once-vilified drug becomes more accepted, researchers around the world are trying to understand how it works and how it might fight disease.

Read full article...

    Orrin Devinsky, a neurologist at New York University, is more skeptical. He’s leading a clinical trial to test CBD against a placebo in treating forms of epilepsy. “There’s real potential,” he says, “but we urgently need valid data.”   

 

Orrin Devinsky, a neurologist at New York University, is more skeptical. He’s leading a clinical trial to test CBD against a placebo in treating forms of epilepsy. “There’s real potential,” he says, “but we urgently need valid data.” 
 

Billings restricts storefronts.

 The city of Billings will continue to use its zoning and business license regulatory authority to keep medical marijuana dispensaries outside city limits.  City Attorney Brent Brooks briefed the city council late Monday night during the council’s 5 ½-hour work session on what a staff committee, which included planners and lawyers, has learned about regulating medical marijuana.  The city prohibits storefronts from selling medical marijuana to cardholders who can use it legally and withholds business licenses to potential medical marijuana businesses.  It does not, and cannot, prohibit personal use of medical marijuana by a cardholder, Brooks said. While they can’t purchase it legally in Billings, medical marijuana cardholders are allowed to cultivate it themselves or purchase it outside Billings.  “What we are talking about is commercial establishments engaged in the medical marijuana business,” Brooks said.  In November 2016, Montana voters approved Citizen Initiative I-182, which repealed the three-patient limit for providers and will, as of June 30, allow providers to hire employees to cultivate, dispense and transport medical marijuana.  Brooks said the committee — which included City Administrator Tina Volek; Planning Director Wyeth Friday; Zoning Coordinator Nicole Cromwell; Joanne Rindahl, who handles business licenses for the city; and Brooks and Assistant City Attorney Gina Dahl — reviewed the city’s medical marijuana ordinances as part of an ongoing effort to amend or repeal outdated ordinances.  According to Brooks, the Montana Medical Marijuana Act “expressly allows the City to regulate the cultivation, manufacture and the use of marijuana to protect the public health, safety and welfare of the City of Billings.”  There’s no Montana precedent on the issue, he said, and the Montana Supreme Court has not ruled on the issue directly.  Other Montana cities employ a variety of approaches to regulate the commercial availability of medical marijuana. Missoula allows dispensaries as a professional office land use. Bozeman has capped the limit at 20 dispensaries. Butte allows medical marijuana businesses, but only in commercial zones.  Great Falls and Kalispell prohibit medical marijuana through land use and zoning regulations. Helena won’t issue business licenses for any activity that violates federal law.  Brooks said Billings can regulate the businesses however it chooses, and council members by consensus opted for something akin to the Great Falls, Kalispell and Helena approaches.  “States that tax marijuana make a decent amount of money off it,” said Councilman Shaun Brown. “But if I can’t tax it, I don’t want to support it.”  Taxing the sale of marijuana “may be compelling, but without state authority, you cannot tax the gross revenues on marijuana,” Brooks said. “State statute says it’s a privilege to have medical marijuana, not a right.”

The city of Billings will continue to use its zoning and business license regulatory authority to keep medical marijuana dispensaries outside city limits.

City Attorney Brent Brooks briefed the city council late Monday night during the council’s 5 ½-hour work session on what a staff committee, which included planners and lawyers, has learned about regulating medical marijuana.

The city prohibits storefronts from selling medical marijuana to cardholders who can use it legally and withholds business licenses to potential medical marijuana businesses.

It does not, and cannot, prohibit personal use of medical marijuana by a cardholder, Brooks said. While they can’t purchase it legally in Billings, medical marijuana cardholders are allowed to cultivate it themselves or purchase it outside Billings.

“What we are talking about is commercial establishments engaged in the medical marijuana business,” Brooks said.

In November 2016, Montana voters approved Citizen Initiative I-182, which repealed the three-patient limit for providers and will, as of June 30, allow providers to hire employees to cultivate, dispense and transport medical marijuana.

Brooks said the committee — which included City Administrator Tina Volek; Planning Director Wyeth Friday; Zoning Coordinator Nicole Cromwell; Joanne Rindahl, who handles business licenses for the city; and Brooks and Assistant City Attorney Gina Dahl — reviewed the city’s medical marijuana ordinances as part of an ongoing effort to amend or repeal outdated ordinances.

According to Brooks, the Montana Medical Marijuana Act “expressly allows the City to regulate the cultivation, manufacture and the use of marijuana to protect the public health, safety and welfare of the City of Billings.”

There’s no Montana precedent on the issue, he said, and the Montana Supreme Court has not ruled on the issue directly.

Other Montana cities employ a variety of approaches to regulate the commercial availability of medical marijuana. Missoula allows dispensaries as a professional office land use. Bozeman has capped the limit at 20 dispensaries. Butte allows medical marijuana businesses, but only in commercial zones.

Great Falls and Kalispell prohibit medical marijuana through land use and zoning regulations. Helena won’t issue business licenses for any activity that violates federal law.

Brooks said Billings can regulate the businesses however it chooses, and council members by consensus opted for something akin to the Great Falls, Kalispell and Helena approaches.

“States that tax marijuana make a decent amount of money off it,” said Councilman Shaun Brown. “But if I can’t tax it, I don’t want to support it.”

Taxing the sale of marijuana “may be compelling, but without state authority, you cannot tax the gross revenues on marijuana,” Brooks said. “State statute says it’s a privilege to have medical marijuana, not a right.”

http://billingsgazette.com/news/local/government-and-politics/billings-will-continue-to-ban-medical-marijuana-dispensaries/article_de05b28f-c6dd-56cd-ba22-9542f3b834ef.html?utm_content=bufferaf197&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=LEEDCC+